Our 2CV Restoration (Part 4)
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 08 July 2011

What is happening to the restoration I hear you ask.

 

Although I haven't posted any updates for over a year, things have moved forward with the 2CV.  The new floor has been fitted, new sills, rear seatbelt mounts, lower section of 'B' posts replaced, bottom of front panels replaced, nearside rear window opening repaired, seat box section replaced, bottom of front footwell replaced, splits in bulkhead around battery mounting brazed.  The next job was to repair below the front vent flap which on investigation proved to be totally rotten.  A repair had been done previously to the bonnet hinge which had been replaced.  It was pop riveted on and then covered in fibre glass mat and filler which hid the poor condition of the metal underneath.  Once this was removed, I discovered why we used to get wet feet whenever it rained.  All of the metal under the dash had rotted!! 

 

New sections have been fabricated to replace the rotten metal.

 

On reading the restoration book, there was a comment regarding the lower windscreen in that it was found to be rotten when the windscreen was removed.  Guess what, I found the same problem.  All rotten metal was removed and a new section fabricated.  This has been brazed in and again, will require filling.  

 

I said in an earlier post that I would have the rest of the panels blasted and phosphated such as the doors etc.  This has now been done.  Although the doors are not too bad, the bottoms will need to be repaired where the rubber weatherstrip is retained.

 

The body has now been taken off the chassis and was turned upside down.  All seams have been sealed with Sikoflex and the whole of the underside has been painted, before being given a liberal coat of Tetroseal underseal.  Where the back of thebody attached to the chassis (in the boot section), there was rop around the mountings.  The rotten metal was cut out and the top and bottom of the mountings has had thick steel plates fitted to give them more strength.  There were some small rust holes in the boot which have been repaired with brazing.

 

A small job was to restore the wing mirrors by replacing the old hard plastic with a silicon rubber replacement.  These were purchased from http://www.retrospecparts.com and are advertised under the brand name of Mirrorcool.   As the mirrors and arms were in good shape, replacing the surround has made them look like new.  It was a fiddle to do, but is you follow the video that is on the website, it works.  The important thing is as they say, even if the rubber looks as though it is too long, do not cut it down.

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Window Surround
Window Surround
Window Surround
New Floor
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'B' Post
 'B' Post
 Seatbelt Mount
 Seatbelt Mount
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'C' Post
  Seatbelt Mount  Seatbelt Mount
Hinge Rot
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Hinge Rot 
 Hinge Rot Hinge Rot 
Hinge Rot 
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New Bits Bulkhead
Bits Fitted
 Bits Fitted Bits Fitted
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 Bits Fitted Bits Fitted
Bits Fitted
Bits Fitted
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Upside Down
Wheelarch
View Of Floor
Another View
 
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  And from The Front
 And the Side
 
 
 

Last Updated ( Monday, 11 June 2012 )